Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, illness I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, illness I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, illness I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com
If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, illness I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, info
I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, illness I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, illness I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com
If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, illness I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, info
I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, information pills population health and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, here a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

Just a few days ago I had the pleasure of recording episode 2 of “The Yaminade” – my new podcast about Yammer and Enterprise Social I am working on. The guest is a good friend of mine and we organised to meet at the café we normally catch up at. It has a good blend of inside dining, purchase and alfresco outdoor long black sipping options. I thought we might find a quiet spot in the café to do the recording.

Unfortunately because it was Friday morning at 10:30am, treatment a lot of people had ventured out from their offices for morning tea and some extra caffeine to finish off the week. Which meant our quick and hopefully quiet catch up to record a podcast episode was starting to turn into what would be my worst nightmare…. BACKGROUND NOISE! But not just any café background noise… we were seated right beside 4 lanes of city street (which you can see in the background of the photo below!)

Now… If I was recording on an iPhone, read more on the built in microphone, USB headsets or even an entry level digital voice recorder, this may have been a disaster. But to be honest the ZoomH4n absolutely showed how valuable a tool it is. Especially at one stage there was so much noise from the road as a large B-Double Truck/Lorry as it hit the brakes as it went past that we couldn’t even hear each other talking!!! When you listen back to the recording you will wonder why on earth we paused and had a good laugh as the truck is only just audible in the background

Here is the process I went through to make sure we got a usable recording.

  1. Turn on the ZoomH4n, and plug in your external microphones via the two connections on the bottom of the device. I was using my Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica XLR/USB Dynamic Microphone. Note that without the external microphones in this case we could not have captured the conversation without all the noise. Whilst the built in stereo microphone (which is awesome by the way) would have done well… the background noise would have still been significant as we were simply conversing across a tall café table
  2. Plug in some headphones into your ZoomH4n
  3. Hit record once so you can start to check the levels. I tried a few settings using the recording levels button on the side of the ZoomH4n – at 80 it was definitely too noisy. At 30 the vocal’s from myself and my guest were just too weak, down on the left hand side of the level monitor. I settled at Rec Level 50 – a good balance of audible voice, and little background noise.
  4. Then I crossed my fingers and hoped for the best as I hit record to start the interview!

The result was pretty surprising. I though the background noise would have totally detracted from the interview and we would have had to re-record the episode. But as it turns out the background noise was nearly non-existent. Apart from the soothing very low level clatter of cups and teaspoons and saucers every now and then – which just added a bit of atmosphere to the recording… you can’t hear much at all. It is chalk and cheese compared to the noise we heard whilst recording. In hindsight, the biggest challenge was being able to hear each other to have a good conversation… the ZoomH4n coupled with external microphones did all the heavy lifting!

You can listen to the finished product where we talked about how a government agency is using Yammer to accelerate cultural transformation. Note that the only post processing on this was the application of the Compressor effect in Audacity – no background noise removal was done at all!

It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, order and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


This evening I was listening to the Tim Ferriss show – and for anyone who is interested in creating podcasts I highly recommend you listen to this episode. Alex recently started Gimlet Media, page and before that was on the team at one of the most popular documentary style radio/podcast shows – This American Life.

Tim’s interview with Alex goes under the covers of the long form documentary style of production – which includes great insights into how to structure, edit, and ultimately produce very high quality shows. Early in the episode, Tim and Alex discuss podcasting equipment. Whilst Tim uses the ZoomH4n
voice recorder (as I mentioned in the post about recording my first podcast), Alex uses the TASCAM DR-100mkII Portable Digital Recorder
. Bottom line from the discussion is that the recording device at that level of quality doesn’t really make a difference…. They are both equally as good! As Alex suggests, the more important focus is the microphone you select. For example – make sure you use a uni-directional microphone, not an omni-directional microphone to ensure that you capture a better recording in the field. Specifically Alex uses the Audio-Technica AT8035 Shotgun Microphone
, which is a different style of Microphone from what I use for recording my podcast about Yammer Community Management (and also different from what Tim uses for the Tim Ferriss Show).

The advantage of a shotgun microphone like the AT8035 is that you can focus in very closely on your interviewee’s voice and drown out all other background noises. It gives you more control over what you are recording.
It has been about 8 weeks since I kicked off recording my new podcast – The Yaminade – using the Zoom H4N Handy Portable Digital Recorder.  Previously I have posted about how I use the voice recorder to capture  my voice, here and the voice of my guests in person using the Behringer XM8500 and Audio-Technica AT2005USBmicrophones.  In person this set up works brilliantly!

But for the past three episodes of the podcast, there I have interviewed people that I couldn’t sit down with face to face.  For example, with the episode where I interviewed Stan Garfield from Deloitte about how they use Yammer as part of their knowledge management strategy – because he lives in Chicago and I live in Australia, I had to record it over Microsoft Lync, or Skype.  Sure, I could have used a call recording application for Skype… but to be honest my biggest fear was if the app crashes half way through an interview.  I wanted to use the ZoomH4n so I had a robust hardware based recording solution.  So how can I record a Skype call using a hardware based voice recorder?

One way I discovered online was to use a very clever hack using the Audio-Technica AT2005USB.

First – plug in the USB cable you received with the Microphone and connect the microphone to your computer. This basically sets it up as your skype Microphone. Which means the person you are interviewing will be able to hear you.

Second – plug in the microphone using your XLR cable into the #1 input on the bottom of the ZoomH4n. That will enable the ZoomH4n capture your voice when you are on the Skype call. Your voice is going both to your PC or Mac for the Skype call, but now also to the ZoomH4n to be recorded.

Third – because there is a headphone jack on the microphone (so you can hear what you are saying) your PC or mac treats the Audio-technica USB/XLR microphone as both a microphone, and a speaker. Which means you can use a CMS105 1/8 inch TRS to 1/4 Inch TRS Adapter Cable to connect that headphones jack directly to the second input on the bottom of your ZoomH4n. This will enable you to record the voice of the person or people you are interviewing on the Skype or Lync call.

Finally – we need to be able to hear the person talking! Plug your headphones into the headphones jack on the ZoomH4n, and hit the record button once so you can test your levels and hear the people on the other end. When you are ready to record (with the permission of the people on the call)… hit record again!

Here is the YouTube video from Ray Ortega which inspired me to buy this gear, and has enabled me to quickly record some great guests on the podcast


If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, illness I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com
If you have been reading any of the other articles at The Best Voice Recorder you will know that the Zoom H4N Portable Digital Recorder
is a great piece of kit for recording research interviews, medicine podcasts, sickness or your kids first off key notes 🙂

This week I am on leave from my day job, and have a great opportunity to see how the Zoom H4N
goes recording the sounds of nature.  I will be at Hamilton Island, which is in the Whitsunday Islands off the Queensland Coast in Australia.  A beautiful part of the world.   I am going to put the Zoom to the test to capture the sounds of the beach, the rain forest, the birds in the sky and a lot more.  Not only that, I will capture some of the ambient sounds around the island. The goal is to see how the ZoomH4n handles different ambient sound recording scenarios.

Whilst I would love to be recording with microphones like the Rode NTG2 Condenser Shotgun Microphone, on this field trip I will be simply putting the Zoom H4n’s built in stereo microphone goes in the wild.

I will post the results and sample recordings from the trip once I am back!
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, illness I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com
I had a great opportunity to travel from Australia to Singapore to deliver a presentation this week.  At the conference I wanted to capture some field based interviews for my Yammer podcast.  As I was only going to be in Singapore for about 47 hours, info
I decided to travel with carry-on luggage only.  The small and light nature of my Zoom H4N
and my two microphones made traveling and recording a breeze.

I have taken the ZoomH4n through airport security at least eight times now – I thought due to the design of the voice recorder (and specifically the stereo microphones on the top of the audio recorder which look similar to the silhouette to a stun gun) my bags would be stopped for closer inspection more regularly.  To be honest it has only been picked up once, and that was by a trainee xray machine operator.

At the conference I wanted to capture a few different pieces of audio.  Firstly, I captured some background noise – the vibe or buzz of the conference room that we were speaking in.  To do this I turned on the Zoom H4N
and then used the built in stereo microphones.  After pressing record, I checked the levels and notice they were a little low, so I used the “rec level” button to push up the sensitivity of the recorder.

After I had captured the ambient noise of the room, I decided to record my the introduction / preamble / monologue for the podcast.  To do this I switched from the built in stereo microphone on the Zoom and instead used my Audio-Technica AT2005USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone
connected via its XLR connection.  The sound was fantastic – despite the loud voices in the room from the 10 tables of 8 people working on desk exercises in the room – I could talk with my normal voice into the Audio-Technica Microphone and get a very good recording.

Finally I plugged in another Microphone – my Behringer XM8500
– to do some 1 on 1 interviews with some of the conference organisers and attendees.  Again some great conversations were captured with next to no issues.  Despire the loud background noise of all the people speaking in the room the ZoomH4n coupled with the two microphones did a stellar job!

You can check it out for yourself – listen to Episode 8 of The Yaminade at http://www.theyaminade.com
I have the great fortune in my job that I get to deliver presentations regularly to audiences of various sizes – from 10 people to 500 people or more.  For example, treatment recently I had the pleasure of delivering a keynote of a track at an Education conference held in Singapore at the Marina Bay Sands!  My usual routine as a speaker is to pop over to the audio desk and introduce myself to the audio tech – clip on the wireless transmitter that the venue has provided, and then try to weave my lapel microphone through my shirt and up to my second top button.  I love the freedom that a good wireless lav mic gives you as a presenter!  No longer tied to the stage or the lectern!

Up until recently I had never thought of recording my own presentations… every now and then the event organiser will record a video of the presentation – but usually they use the on board microphone and the audio quality is horrible.  Since getting my hands on the Zoom H4n recorder, getting a good quality recording of a presentation has been on my to do list.  At first I looked at wired lav microphones like the Audio-Technica ATR-3350 Lavalier Microphone but the thought of walking around on stage with my ZoomH4n clipped to my belt didn’t really excite me!

The last couple of events I have spoken at where I have used a wireless microphone, they haven’t invested in an audio technician that could handle the “out of the ordinary” request to plug my ZoomH4n into their sound desk to get a recording (or they had a policy which meant I couldn’t do it)… so I decided to take matters into my own hands.

After reading how the team at VaynerMedia put together the #askgaryvee videos and podcasts – and in particular the wireless lav microphones they use to get a great voice recording… I purchased the Sennheiser EW 112P system (pictured above) – which comprises of a wireless transmitter to clip on my belt, a good quality lapel mic to clip on my shirt, and a wireless receiver to use with a mixing board, or in my case, plug directly into my ZoomH4n audio recorder This was a great solution to my problem – getting a good quality audio recording when presenting to an audience…  I simply:

  • plug the receiver into my ZoomH4n,
  • clip the transmitter to my belt
  • weave the lav mic up my shirt and clip it on
  • make sure everything is turned on
  • hit record on my ZoomH4n to test the levels
  • hit record again to start the recording

And the resulting sound quality is great. Don’t have a ZoomH4n and want to record your presentation??  I found this great deal over at Amazon.com which bundles a Zoom H4n recorder with the Sennheiser EW 112P wireless microphone system – make sure you check it out!

The next question though… should I buy another  Sennheiser EW 112P system so I can record good quality conversations for my podcasts, or record panel discussions?  It is certainly tempting after the performance of the wireless microphone so far!